Teaching Off the Bike, Part 2

Part 1 of this series provided general reasons why teaching off the bike is important. Now, let’s do a deep-dive on how to do it in the most effective, engaging, and entertaining way possible. Your riders may even prefer when you teach off the bike after you wow them with your skills!

We have 12 ways to make sure that you enjoy the process and engage your riders so well that they hang on every word (or moments of silence). These are for when you have to be off the bike for an entire class, whether it be due to injury, giving up your bike for a member, teaching a large number of classes during the week, or any other reason.

5 Responses to “Teaching Off the Bike, Part 2”

  1. JenniferKoscelnik says:

    What great tips! I actually learned how to teach off the bike in a coaching environment, but it definitely seems to be out of the ordinary for an instructor to do so unless you’re leading a class of athletes on trainers.

    While I consider myself a cyclist, and have been leading outdoor group rides for years, regularly teaching indoor cycling is new to me. I’ve taught on trainers in the winter when the weather keeps us inside (I’m in CO, too – Denver), but not as a regular gig.

    I start a new job teaching indoor cycling next week, and am still recovering from a snowboarding injury that blew out my right knee – I was just able to pedal for the first time since my injury last week. Again, while I originally learned how to “coach” off the bike, these are great reminders for me as I start this new gig injured.

    Thank you!!
    Jenn

  2. robertwblatz says:

    Very timely information. Just got back from a cycling trip to Spain. Wiped out at high speed while going DH and hitting loose gravel; resulting in 3 fractured ribs, a fractured scapula and road rash from shoulder to ankle.

    So while I teach off the bike on a regular basis as soon as I’m able I’ll be teaching 3-5 classes a week off the bike for 4-6 weeks. The tips on coaching are very welcome.

    Thanks,

    Bob

    • Oh no Bob, I cringe as I read that! I’m so sorry. I’ve bruised my ribs badly and THAT was bad, can’t even imagine breaking 3 of them. Not to mention your other injuries.

      Years ago, early in my teaching career,I had bilateral bunionectomy, both feet in soft casts. Taught off the bike for 6 weeks. That’s where I got most of my experience to share in these articles!

      So glad we can help. I would very much like to hear about your experience for the 4–6 weeks you teach off the bike. Would you share that with us?

      Other than the crash…how was cycling in Spain?

      Heal quickly!

  3. FaithAnderson says:

    I taught my class this morning off the bike for the first time “ever” and it was an eye opening experience. I tweaked my back and didn’t want to cancel so it was a last minute decision to keep it scheduled. Everyone loved my energy and felt as if I was working out with them. For me, well I made it through without a drop of sweat!! Thanks for these helpful hints for next time.

    • I hope your back heals quickly, that’s no fun! But so glad the experience of teaching off the bike was so positive. I have heard that again and again, how the class really enjoys the energy of the instructor off the bike!

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