Currently Browsing: Programming and Management

What Indoor Cycling Instructors Can Learn from the #MeToo Movement

We don’t know what students are thinking or what might make them uncomfortable with either our touch or our talk. The #MeToo movement has reminded us that a wrong touch or a wrong comment can feel creepy even if the intention was innocent.

Read More...

Surviving the Holidaze

The holiday season is here, and with it comes the ebb and flow of rider attendance and the highs and lows of holiday stress. Are you prepared for the additional demands on your time around your regular teaching schedule? Here are a few tips for managing the stress before it manages you and affects how you deliver your cycling classes.

Read More...

Facebook Live! Let’s talk about building community in your classes…and Halloween photo submission drawing!

Watch my short Facebook Live video where I discuss ideas for creating community in your classes and studio so you can attract more riders and keep them coming back and spreading the word. I also pick the names of the winners of the Halloween photo drawing!

Read More...

What To Do When You Have Students Who Are Chronically Late for Class

When you have late students, put your participants’ needs ahead of any inconvenience, imposition, or disrespect that you may feel. Keep the needs of the whole class in mind but don’t punish a student for being late, either directly or indirectly.

Read More...

Worried About the Poor Level of Instruction at a Club You Visit? You CAN Make a Difference!

With the increase in “non-traditional” indoor cycling classes rife with contraindications, and the increase in instructors learning new “moves” from YouTube, so many classes these days are filled with safety concerns. Many instructors who attend one of these classes are either too uncomfortable to approach the instructor or feel that if they contact the facility, no one will care. We’d like to share with you an example of an instructor who did step up and was able to make some positive changes at one club.

Read More...

Official Club Policy for Class Etiquette

The best way to preempt problems in your cycling classes is to have an official club policy for the rules of etiquette. These rules should be posted on the cycling room wall, which will help instructors when dealing with potential problems. In this article, we provide you with seven considerations when assembling your own rules, and two samples of ways you can present your rules.

Read More...

How to Deal with Students that Talk in Class, Part 2

Last week Bill gave some diplomatic approaches to dealing with disruptive students. I’ve got a few more ideas here that range from serious, to humorous, to laying down the law of the land. How likely you are to encounter problems, and how you choose to respond to them, will depend on a variety of factors. It could depend on your market, the time of day, or the culture of your club. But make no mistake, it also is very much dependent upon the culture you’ve established in your own classes from day one.

Read More...

How to Deal with a Student Who Talks in Class, Part 1

We’ve all had moments when a student disrupts our class by talking a little too loudly. It annoys us, the instructor, because we lose our flow and concentration. We also know it annoys their fellow students and makes it hard for them to follow our cues, but what can we do about it? In part 1, Bill Roach discusses several steps you can take to keep students in line. Jennifer Sage has some additional advice that will be posted in part 2.

Read More...

Create a Fun Video for Your Members

The Buffalo Athletic Club has created a series of fun videos to educate their members about etiquette. The group fitness director has given me permission to share this video with you—hopefully, it will give you ideas to create some humorous videos of your own!

Read More...

Using Empathy to Better Know Our Members’ Needs

In today’s article Apryl Stern walks us through a recent workshop she took on design thinking and helps us find ways to naturally create an overall experience that better fits our students, and gives them reasons to keep coming back. Grab a pen and paper and let’s get started!

Read More...

« Previous Entries