Currently Browsing: Physiology, Heart Rate & RPE

The Art of the Warm-up, Part 6: Sample Warm-ups for High-Intensity and Loop Profiles

Here are three more sample warm-ups for five more profiles. Two of the warm-ups can be used for challenging high-intensity VO2 max or anaerobic capacity training sessions. One is an example of how you might design your warm-up for a loop profile consisting of repeated laps of the same terrain.

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The Art of the Warm-up, Part 5: Sample Warm-ups for Workouts at Threshold

Part 5 gives you four more warm-ups, this time for profiles that include threshold intervals of varying lengths, field tests, and time trials. Not all warm-ups are created equal—what you do to warm up depends on the intensity and makeup of your workout.

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The Art of the Warm-up, Part 4: Sample Warm-ups for Endurance and Climbing Profiles

In part 4 of this series on warming up, you’ll get the first four of eleven sample warm-ups to go with thirteen completely different profiles. This segment covers warm-ups for endurance profiles of varying lengths, cruise intervals, and epic climbs.

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The Art of the Warm-up, Part 3: Perceived Exertion

Some instructors and students believe that a “warm-up” always means an easy intensity, and is thus a waste of time. But remember that a body that is ill-prepared for the intensity of the workout will not deliver what is asked of it. In part 3 of this series on warming up, you will learn how perceived exertion does not follow heart rate in the early stages of a workout and why you should avoid heart rate cues during the warm-up. I also give you six factors to keep in mind as you design your profiles and deliver your class that may affect how quickly someone warms up.

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The Art of the Warm-Up, Part 2: What Is Happening Physiologically?

How important is the warm-up in a 60-minute indoor cycling class? Far more than you might imagine! Too often instructors don’t give the warm-up the attention it deserves. In part 2 of this series, you will learn the physiology behind warming up. I give you an analogy that I think will greatly enhance your understanding of why having “all hands on deck” is so important to functioning properly during your event or training session!

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The Art of the Warm-Up, Part 1: Is Your Spinning Class Warm-Up Sufficient?

I used to race mountain bikes years ago, but if I knew then what I know now about proper warm-ups I would have been much better prepared and probably would have performed better! This article is part 1 of a 6-part series on effective warm-ups for cycling classes. The purpose of this first article is to get you to pose the question to yourself, “Are you warming up properly in your classes? What can you be doing better?” (Originally posted in 2016, this series has been updated with new information and tips)

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Facebook Live Video: Cadence and Music Choices During Recovery

Here is the follow-up to my Facebook Live video on the importance of recovery within your interval-training sessions. This one comes with lots of great add-ons, including a 12-page guide on how to use music and coaching to keep riders engaged during the recoveries. It also comes with three Spotify playlists to help you choose both your high-intensity short interval songs of 1–3 minutes, and short songs that are good for your recoveries. You’ll never be lacking for recovery song options!

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Facebook Live Video: The Importance of Recovery Within a Training Session

How do you counter the mindset of riders who reject recoveries? How do you educate them so that they not only understand the importance of recovery, but they relish it? What intensity should your recovery be at? Is it always that way, or are there exceptions? How do you keep riders engaged during recoveries so they don’t get distracted or bored? I answer all that and more in this informative Facebook Live training session.

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Minimum Effective Dose (MED) and Power Zone Training in Indoor Cycling

We’ve all heard the phrase “Exercise is the best medicine.” However, no medicine is equally good at any dose; too little and the desired effects will not be achieved, too much and negative side effects result. Dosage in the context of exercise means training load: the intensity, duration, and frequency of a given activity. What are the best doses of each level of intensity and how will knowing this help us plan our classes?

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Understanding and Raising the Lactate Threshold, Part 2

In the last article on understanding lactate threshold, we discussed the three different energy systems of the body and how ATP, the energy currency of the body, was produced in all three systems concurrently. Each system provides different amounts of energy to the working muscles at varying rates for distinct intensity demands. To further shore up this concept, it would be helpful to be somewhat familiar with where our bodies derive the energy to power our movement and basic body functions.

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