Currently Browsing: Instructor Issues & growth

Developing Your Own Teaching Calendar Can Make Your Classes Better

Need some organizational help? Here is a simple model for organizing your class profiles. Advantages: You won’t have to start over each time you write a class. You will be able to create a flow of work from week to week. You will be certain to include holiday and other special event classes. You will even have a place to keep track of those little reminders from class to class. And you won’t have to spend time hunting through your computer for that class you misplaced. Bottom line: less stress.

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Tips for the Shy Instructor, Part 2: Stop Trying to be Perfect. Be Yourself but Bigger.

Are you the shy instructor? You can feel confident and energetic when teaching your indoor cycling class even if you are an introvert. Shy instructors can be terrific by simply unlearning a few misconceptions about performing in public. If this is you, it’s time to up your game by stopping the behaviors or beliefs that may be limiting your performance. In part 1 of this series, you learned to rechannel your anxiety and to stop thinking of public performance as a “gift.” In part 2, you will learn to stop doubting yourself.

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Tips for the Shy Instructor, Part 1: Make Your Anxiety Work For You, Not Against You

Are you the shy instructor? It is possible to feel confident and energetic when teaching your indoor cycling class even if you are an introvert. You don’t have to be an extrovert, a performer, to get up in front of a class. In part 1 of this series, you will learn to stop trying to calm your anxiety and to stop thinking of public performance as a “gift” you were not granted.

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The New Instructor: 10 Tips for Mastering the Class Intro, Part 2

Our next three tips to help you master the class intro: The Class Objective, Training Zones (RPE), and encouraging your riders to Work at Their Own Pace.

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The New Instructor: 10 Tips for Mastering the Class Intro, Part 1

New instructors are faced with a dilemma: you cue the music to begin teaching your first indoor cycling class and realize there is so much information to cover within the first few minutes of class. Will you remember it all? Will you explain everything correctly? Will someone remove the butterflies from your stomach? Welcome to part 1 of a 3-part series to master your class intro.

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An Incredible Way to Learn About the Effects of Your Profiles and Coaching

When you learn how to read and interpret a workout file it is an amazing tool to aid in putting together profiles. You will better understand the possible impact your choices (cadence, resistance, power, etc.) will have on your riders. By looking at a file from a less fit rider who suffered in the class or was unable to do the prescribed workout, you will understand why some might struggle with your coaching. Or, maybe you might discover that some things you are doing might not be as effective as you thought.

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Worried About the Poor Level of Instruction at a Club You Visit? You CAN Make a Difference!

With the increase in “non-traditional” indoor cycling classes rife with contraindications, and the increase in instructors learning new “moves” from YouTube, so many classes these days are filled with safety concerns. Many instructors who attend one of these classes are either too uncomfortable to approach the instructor or feel that if they contact the facility, no one will care. We’d like to share with you an example of an instructor who did step up and was able to make some positive changes at one club.

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My Cycling Class Today: When Riders Ask Questions After Class

Bill had two new riders in his class recently. They had taken many other classes, just not his. After class, they asked him some excellent questions, which reminded him of the importance of being equipped with excellent answers before you are asked. Their questions—and his answers—will open your eyes.

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How to Get Riders to Follow Your Instructions with the 3-2-1 Approach

One of the many benefits to teaching indoor cycling is that it designed to be a multi-level class requiring little coordination and choreography. While we’re not looking for military precision in unified movement and intensity, there are often unspoken expectations that the instructor has for the riders. When a rider, or the entire group of riders, strays too far, it can become distracting. In this article, Cori Parks suggests a simple approach to classroom management.

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The Ones Who Don’t Want to Work Hard…Or Do They?

Izabella relays a cautionary tale about one experience she had with a woman who came to her classes, and seemed like she didn’t want to do any work. It is an example that became a revelation to her and highlights the importance of not judging riders and of giving one-on-one attention to them whenever possible.

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