Currently Browsing: Instructor Issues & growth

How to Handle a Difficult Student

Sometimes students are just plain difficult. They don’t want to listen. They might even set up a power struggle with you in class. Would a mental checklist help you in these situations?

Read More...

Top 7 Ways to Grow as an Indoor Cycling Instructor in 2018

This year, I want to challenge you to reach new heights in your coaching. This may mean moving out of your own comfort zone. It’s something we ask of our riders all the time; how about ourselves? What can we do to push ourselves, to take risks, to put ourselves out there in front of our students and announce to the world that we aren’t afraid of growth?

Read More...

You Just Wait: Indoor Cycling Injuries Lurk

When it comes to overuse injures, I’d rather not wait. Cycling is an activity used by many physical therapists for rehabilitation. When done properly, cycling is very gentle on the joints and muscles. I repeat…when done properly.

Read More...

6 Ways Recording Your Class Can Take You from Critical to Confident

As indoor cycling coaches, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our delivery and clarity in class so that we may continue to grow. This article explores one uncomfortable way for us to tackle our growth by audio recording our classes, then listening to ourselves and adjusting based on what we hear.

Read More...

Reflections on an Unexpected Conversation

In the final minutes of 2014, I found myself in a loud room full of total strangers, except for my family, seated next to a 72-year-old woman. We scooted closer to each other on the crowded L-shaped couch and leaned in for an unexpected conversation, at the top of our lungs, yet still under the din of the partygoers.

Read More...

What Indoor Cycling Instructors Can Learn from the #MeToo Movement

We don’t know what students are thinking or what might make them uncomfortable with either our touch or our talk. The #MeToo movement has reminded us that a wrong touch or a wrong comment can feel creepy even if the intention was innocent.

Read More...

If They’re Bored, You’re Boring

For so many years I’ve heard cycling/Spinning instructors lament that “Students get bored if the class is cycling specific, so I need to [add silly move here] or they won’t come to class!” Well, I have news for you…maybe it’s not the moves or technique that are boring; maybe it’s you! On that note, here are 13 ways you can be sure to keep students engaged without resorting to silly gimmicks on the bike. Make this your Instructor New Year’s Revolution!

Read More...

My Cycling Class Today: Teaching Students Who Are Deaf or Blind…or Both.

ICA’s editor, Shari Miranda, was approached about teaching a class with a rider who was both deaf and blind. Shari spent a few weeks preparing for this class, including emailing with the rider and his interpreter about the best ways to communicate the profile. She shares what she did and how it went.

Read More...

Three Minutes to Make a First impression

Jackie Cohen Maniscalco had one of those 3-minute large group auditions we wrote about recently at a major chain club. In fact, Jackie’s request for help in the ICA Facebook group is what inspired me to write the article. Jackie had an interesting experience at her audition and agreed to share it with you all. You know, in case you might ever experience one like it where you actually get less than 3 minutes to show what you know!

Read More...

Exercise Physiology for Interval Training in Indoor Cycling, Part 2

Knowledgeable instructors are effective instructors. Deepening your understanding of exercise physiology allows you to be that capable teacher whose students achieve their fitness, weight loss, or health goals. When you know how human metabolic systems operate and how to harness them in a training session, your classes will be purposeful and your participants will feel confident following your lead. This exercise physiology primer is the preface for our interval training series.

Read More...

« Previous Entries