Currently Browsing: Form and Technique

Rolling Hills and Switchbacks—My 2002 WSSC Session

In 2002, I presented a session at WSSC called “Rolling Hills and Switchbacks.” Prior to that date, these techniques weren’t a big part of Spinning® (or any indoor cycling program for that matter). I want to give you my handout from 2002, for free! I’ve changed a few things in how I coach these and will be sharing those coaching techniques very soon, but much of this still applies for realistic simulation of riding rollers and switchbacks.

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Webinar: The Days of Hand Positions on the Bike Are Numbered

A few years ago, Tom Scotto and I did a webinar on hand positions. It is the perfect visual follow up to last week’s post on hand positions while standing. It provides the practical and biomechanical reasons for where to place your hands while riding, whether seated or standing.

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Ask the Expert: When I Stand, Should I Use Hand Position 2 or 3?

In a recent profile, I was asked why I don’t assign a hand position when riders stand. This is a great question that I get often. Let’s talk hand positions seated and standing, and why we go there.

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Ask the Expert: How Do You Do a Spin-Up and Is It Different From a Surge or a Sprint?

I received a great question recently in the ICA Facebook group from Sarah asking what the difference between a “spin-up” and a “surge” is. We had an Ask the Expert post from 2013 with a similar question from Angela asking, “How exactly do you teach a spin-up? Is it different from a sprint?”  So, I have edited the previous article below and updated it with Sarah’s question to help you fully understand what a spin-up is and how to teach one, including referencing a full profile on these drills.

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Standing Challenge, Take 2: Compare Standing With Seated Efforts

Two months ago, I wrote a post about the wisdom (or lack of it) of standing for very long periods out of the saddle. I challenged anyone in the indoor cycling world to perform my standing climb challenge. I still think it’s worth trying, but I recognize it’s not a very effective workout, so I have a much more attainable challenge; one which will also be eye-opening as you compare power, heart rate, and cadence with standing versus seated efforts. Will you do this challenge?

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How Long Should You Stand Out of the Saddle?

Have you ever heard of a class conducted entirely out of the saddle? Would you ever consider it, or take part if you were a student in that class? Here is a synopsis of a discussion that happened in an online forum on the subject, with my input, plus an excellent article on the science of standing versus seated riding. I hereby challenge all instructors to take part in the STANDING CLIMB CHALLENGE so we can gather data as well as personal anecdotes.

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How to Protect Your Knees in Indoor Cycling Class

Our knees are particularly vulnerable to injury when we don’t use some common sense in our indoor classes. Fortunately, most cycling injuries are preventable. Dr Peter Donaldson, of Michigan Orthopedic Institute in Southeast Michigan, helps us understand how to protect your knees from pain and injury.

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Ask the Expert: To Jump or Not to Jump

Jumps can be controversial. They are a big part of the curriculum of some indoor cycling programs; others avoid them or list them as contraindicated. What’s my take? I say “it depends!” Let’s look at three ways jumps should NOT be taught and four different ways to teach them in the most effective manner, from most to least cycling specific.

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Strategies for Strength: The Cheek to Cheek Technique

The majority of people who do not like to stand claim they feel awkward out of the saddle and it drives their heart rate through the roof. Many believe they don’t have the strength to stand. It is not an issue of strength but technique.

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Respect the Bike: Create Safe and Scientifically Sound Cycling Classes

The ignorance of exercise science in the cycling studio has to stop!

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