Currently Browsing: Form and Technique

How Long Should You Stand Out of the Saddle?

Have you ever heard of a class conducted entirely out of the saddle? Would you ever consider it, or take part if you were a student in that class? Here is a synopsis of a discussion that happened in an online forum on the subject, with my input, plus an excellent article on the science of standing versus seated riding. I hereby challenge all instructors to take part in the STANDING CLIMB CHALLENGE so we can gather data as well as personal anecdotes.

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How to Protect Your Knees in Indoor Cycling Class

Our knees are particularly vulnerable to injury when we don’t use some common sense in our indoor classes. Fortunately, most cycling injuries are preventable. Dr Peter Donaldson, of Michigan Orthopedic Institute in Southeast Michigan, helps us understand how to protect your knees from pain and injury.

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Ask the Expert: To Jump or Not to Jump

Jumps can be controversial. They are a big part of the curriculum of some indoor cycling programs; others avoid them or list them as contraindicated. What’s my take? I say “it depends!” Let’s look at three ways jumps should NOT be taught and four different ways to teach them in the most effective manner, from most to least cycling specific.

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Strategies for Strength: The Cheek to Cheek Technique

The majority of people who do not like to stand claim they feel awkward out of the saddle and it drives their heart rate through the roof. Many believe they don’t have the strength to stand. It is not an issue of strength but technique.

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Respect the Bike: Create Safe and Scientifically Sound Cycling Classes

The ignorance of exercise science in the cycling studio has to stop!

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TBT: Ask the Expert: My Student Rides with Too Much Resistance, Part 2

(Throwback Thursday) Instructors should understand the very real risks of high resistance/low cadence pedaling, and know when to provide options for your riders. This article also covers the physiological reasons behind why very low cadence is not beneficial to anyone.

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TBT: A Physiology Lesson For Students Who Pedal with Too Much Resistance

Throwback Thursday: Have you ever had a rider pedal way too slowly with too much resistance, yet she didn’t respond to your cues? It may be time to offer a little physiology lesson. You have to be careful not to go over their heads and have their eyes glaze over, so here is a short, interesting, and easy-to-understand way to explain why they might want to increase their cadence.

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Ask the Expert: Cues for Quad Dominance

“Is there a way to cue a rider—in layman’s terms—so that they are not just using or mostly using their quads?” This is a great question and the answer is yes…and no.

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Ask the Expert: Arm Fatigue for a Beginner

Jean asked what to do about her new rider’s discomfort he feels in his triceps. The advice provided is not just for new riders, but is a great review for all instructors to know how to coach hand placement to minimize discomfort or arm fatigue for all riders.

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Why Do You Bounce in the Saddle?

You may have noticed how some people seem to bounce in the saddle on an indoor bike. But do you know why this happens and what you can do about it?

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