Currently Browsing: Communication and Presentation Skills

Top 10 Reasons to Return to Indoor Cycling this Fall and Ways to Promote It

Looking for ways to lure those outdoor, summer cyclists back indoors this fall to your class? Look no more! We’ve got 10 reason to share with your students as well as ways to promote it!

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How to Educate Your Riders, Part 3: How to Teach Without Being “Teachy”

Indoor cycling instructors have to wear different hats at different times. How many hats do you have in your skills closet? And do you know the right time to wear each one? Here are some best practices to employ when trying to educate your students, and links to five additional articles on how to teach your students outside of class time.

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Educating Your Students, Part 2: Using Humor, Metaphors, and Analogies

Everyone had a class with a fun and wacky science teacher in high school, right? I’m not advocating that we start developing quirks or acting wacky in our indoor cycling classes, but the point is, making education fun using humor and wit is a great way to learn AND and a fun way to teach. Hopefully our dating, bagels, poultry, and pasta analogies will spark some ideas to create some of your own wacky ways to explain something on the bike.

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“Break Glass in Case of Emergency”: How to Manage Defiant Students

You know those red boxes where you break the glass to throw the emergency alarm? You need one of those in your instructor toolbox. The reason you need one is the defiant student.

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Top 7 Ways to Grow as an Indoor Cycling Instructor in 2018

This year, I want to challenge you to reach new heights in your coaching. This may mean moving out of your own comfort zone. It’s something we ask of our riders all the time; how about ourselves? What can we do to push ourselves, to take risks, to put ourselves out there in front of our students and announce to the world that we aren’t afraid of growth?

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If They’re Bored, You’re Boring

For so many years I’ve heard cycling/Spinning instructors lament that “Students get bored if the class is cycling specific, so I need to [add silly move here] or they won’t come to class!” Well, I have news for you…maybe it’s not the moves or technique that are boring; maybe it’s you! On that note, here are 13 ways you can be sure to keep students engaged without resorting to silly gimmicks on the bike. Make this your Instructor New Year’s Revolution!

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My Cycling Class Today: Teaching Students Who Are Deaf or Blind…or Both.

ICA’s editor, Shari Miranda, was approached about teaching a class with a rider who was both deaf and blind. Shari spent a few weeks preparing for this class, including emailing with the rider and his interpreter about the best ways to communicate the profile. She shares what she did and how it went.

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Anatomy of Inquiry-Based Coaching

When it comes to cueing in the cycling studio, there are two distinct paths instructors can take: telling and asking. Both have their place and both are paired nicely with showing, or demonstrating. Cori explains how incorporating questions into your cueing can elicit more effort toward the goal and ownership in the outcome from your riders.

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Landing Your Next Indoor Cycling Gig: A Practical Guide to Auditioning, Part 3

In this final post of our series on auditions, we cover what to do immediately after the audition and what to do when you get the news of “yay” or “nay.”

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Landing Your Next Indoor Cycling Gig: A Practical Guide to Auditioning, Part 2

Lights, camera, action. What to do when being judged from the instructor bike.

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