Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

Using a 30-Minute Demonstration Class to Attract Seniors to Your Classes

Senior riders are becoming one of the most important demographics for our industry. The prevalence of baby boomers graduating into senior status is an opportunity for us to serve more people. But there is reluctance among this group to try indoor cycling. How can we overcome their resistance? I think the answer is the 30-minute senior rider demonstration class. This class can go miles in relieving the riders’ anxiety and creating dedicated new riders for our classes.

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“No Pain, No Gain” in Indoor Cycling?

We’ve all heard the adage “No Pain, No Gain,” and the reasons it’s a myth. But we also hear that it’s not possible to really succeed or improve performance unless you learn to suffer at your chosen sport. So what is it? Where is the line drawn? And how should indoor cycling instructors coach? Should we never use words like “suffering” in our coaching?

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Coaching through Tragedy

Laura’s small community is grieving over a recent tragedy. As she prepared for her Saturday ride she scoured the web to find information on how to teach grieving students. Today she shares her thought process as she prepared for her class and encourages a dialogue so that others will have information to draw upon if faced with a similar situation.

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How to Incorporate Long Intervals, Part 1: Why Longer Intervals Are Important

Incorporating longer intervals of 5 to 20 minutes can be the key to a higher level of fitness, regardless of what your specific goals are. For some reason, however, there is a reticence to the idea of longer intervals. Here are six reasons why you should teach your riders to love longer intervals in high Zone 3 to Zone 4.

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Three Advanced Cueing Methods to Help Participants Dial Up Success

Cycling instructors face an interesting challenge. We have the task of putting together safe, effective, and fun workouts, while choosing music that will motivate and move the soul. Beyond that we must also clearly, concisely, and repeatedly convey meaning, feeling, and intention to a room full of very different people with diverse learning styles and potentially dissimilar fitness levels. This article addresses your road map to success by describing three specific methods of communication to convey the desired level of effort and intensity required by participants within each and every class you teach.

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Muscular Strength Profile: Stampede!

If you love proving that indoor cycling is not just for cardio bunnies, this is the profile for you. The overall goal is to place as much force on the leg muscles as possible for the duration of each muscular strength interval. Consider this profile the equivalent of performing single-leg squats or lunges—800 of them!

The intervals are short, but they are intense. If done correctly, each interval will bring a rider close to failure in the last seconds.

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How to Educate Your Riders, Part 4: Using Storytelling and Non-Cycling Examples

Continuing our series on Educating Your Students, Christine gives some suggestions about how to use non-cycling examples to help students understand cycling technique and what they should be feeling while pedaling. She does this primarily through storytelling in her profiles, although that’s not a prerequisite of the method. Christine is an expert at this technique and has been extremely successful educating her students.

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Powerful Words Create Performances in the Olympics…and in Your Cycling Class

What does the coxswain of the 2012 Olympic rowing team and indoor cycling instructors have in common? Powerful words!

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Educating Your Students, Part 2: Using Humor, Metaphors, and Analogies

Everyone had a class with a fun and wacky science teacher in high school, right? I’m not advocating that we start developing quirks or acting wacky in our indoor cycling classes, but the point is, making education fun using humor and wit is a great way to learn AND and a fun way to teach. Hopefully our dating, bagels, poultry, and pasta analogies will spark some ideas to create some of your own wacky ways to explain something on the bike.

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Should Indoor Cycling Instructors Educate Our Riders? Part 1

At first I was confused by this question. As indoor cycling instructors, why would we not educate our riders? As a rider, why would I not want to know more about how a class, drill, or movement was going to impact me? It seems silly. There are times when we need to educate a rider to help them make corrections in their form. Education can also provide great motivation to try or persist, knowing the ultimate short- and long-term benefits.

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