Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

Facebook Live Mini Training: Why Cadence Matters, Part 1

This mini training provides a basic understanding of cadence and how it’s measured, and helps you understand the physiological factors of cadence that you should consider when designing your profiles. 

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Facebook Live Video: The Importance of Recovery Within a Training Session

How do you counter the mindset of riders who reject recoveries? How do you educate them so that they not only understand the importance of recovery, but they relish it? What intensity should your recovery be at? Is it always that way, or are there exceptions? How do you keep riders engaged during recoveries so they don’t get distracted or bored? I answer all that and more in this informative Facebook Live training session.

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This One Thing

Yes, I do a lot to prepare for my classes. I spend hours making playlists. I read articles on physiology and innovative cueing. You do it too. But there’s one thing I do that I think makes a huge difference in my coaching. And maybe you don’t agree with its importance. Are you ready?

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Coach’s Corner: Cues from Students Help You Develop a Training Purpose for Your Classes

After each class you teach, take stock of what you have noticed among your riders and their reactions to your profile and your cues. What can you help your students refine and improve upon? Take your observations to the next step and use them to help you develop your training objectives for your next class or series of classes based on what you observe. 

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Help Your Riders Leave Class With a Sense of Achievement—Even If They Don’t Understand the Console

Have you ever subbed a class where the riders didn’t know what to do with the console? Have you had a mixed class with some who understand watts and others who have no idea? Izabela inspires you to use the great tools you have at your disposal and provides you with some of her favorite ways for dealing with these scenarios, including a great way to help riders to understand watts even if they’ve never done an FTP test.

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The Coach’s Corner: Using Your Coaching Radar

You can have the very best in equipment, the most exclusive training facility, and all of the fanfare that goes with it, but what really trumps all of this is the way the class is organized and coached. Janet shows you how to turn your coaching “radar” on the moment you walk into class so you can key into the specific needs of your riders.

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Using a 30-Minute Demonstration Class to Attract Seniors to Your Classes

Senior riders are becoming one of the most important demographics for our industry. The prevalence of baby boomers graduating into senior status is an opportunity for us to serve more people. But there is reluctance among this group to try indoor cycling. How can we overcome their resistance? I think the answer is the 30-minute senior rider demonstration class. This class can go miles in relieving the riders’ anxiety and creating dedicated new riders for our classes.

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“No Pain, No Gain” in Indoor Cycling?

We’ve all heard the adage “No Pain, No Gain,” and the reasons it’s a myth. But we also hear that it’s not possible to really succeed or improve performance unless you learn to suffer at your chosen sport. So what is it? Where is the line drawn? And how should indoor cycling instructors coach? Should we never use words like “suffering” in our coaching?

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Coaching through Tragedy

Laura’s small community is grieving over a recent tragedy. As she prepared for her Saturday ride she scoured the web to find information on how to teach grieving students. Today she shares her thought process as she prepared for her class and encourages a dialogue so that others will have information to draw upon if faced with a similar situation.

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How to Incorporate Long Intervals, Part 1: Why Longer Intervals Are Important

Incorporating longer intervals of 5 to 20 minutes can be the key to a higher level of fitness, regardless of what your specific goals are. For some reason, however, there is a reticence to the idea of longer intervals. Here are six reasons why you should teach your riders to love longer intervals in high Zone 3 to Zone 4.

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