Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

Just Got Certified: Now What? Tips for New Instructors, Part 1

Some new instructors are more challenged than others with stage fright, especially if they do not come from a group fitness background. Most of these insecurities are easily quelled with practice, practice, practice. Allow yourself the time and space to make mistakes. Here are some tips for new instructors that will minimize your nervousness as you move beyond your certification.

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How Many Turns on the Resistance Knob?

Have you ever cued to turn up the resistance by giving a number of turns to your class? You may want to find a better way to cue resistance! Caesar filmed a brief video for his riders who have been used to being told the number of turns expected, so he wanted to show them why it’s not an effective cue. We hope this helps you so you can explain to your class why you don’t cue that way.

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How to Get Riders to Follow Your Instructions with the 3-2-1 Approach

One of the many benefits to teaching indoor cycling is that it designed to be a multi-level class requiring little coordination and choreography. While we’re not looking for military precision in unified movement and intensity, there are often unspoken expectations that the instructor has for the riders. When a rider, or the entire group of riders, strays too far, it can become distracting. In this article, Cori Parks suggests a simple approach to classroom management.

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Top 7 Ways to Grow as an Indoor Cycling Instructor in 2017

This year, I want to challenge you to reach new heights in your coaching. This may mean moving out of your own comfort zone. It’s something we ask of our riders all the time; how about ourselves? What can we do to push ourselves, to take risks, to put ourselves out there in front of our students and announce to the world that we aren’t afraid of growth?

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Strategies for Strength: Benchmarks and Rewards, Part 2

Part 2 of this Strategies for Strength provides ways to use the concepts of benchmarks and rewards in your indoor cycling classes, including specific visualizations and cues.

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Strategies for Strength: Benchmarks and Rewards, Pt. 1

Creating benchmarks and rewarding yourself for completing them is a classic strategy to get through a long and challenging event. I bet you have used a version of this outdoors, whether on a bike or in a 10K running race or triathlon. I use it all the time when on long climbs as it helps break up the distance or length of time into bite-size chunks. Here are some photos to use to inspire your students to break up the challenge into manageable segments.

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Strategies for Strength: Projection into the Future

This strategy is a mind game you play with yourself. But it works, and it takes your mind off of the current discomfort you are feeling and allows you to experience the joy of accomplishment even before it’s completed.

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Strategies for Strength: Climbing at Tempo

Many of us have seen professional riders climbing the famed ascents of the Tour de France. One observation is the speed at which they climb. Not just how fast their bikes are going, but how fast their legs are spinning. This faster climbing cadence is often referred to as “climbing at tempo.” For those of us that ride outside, this is not climbing in one’s granny gear (no offense, Mom), but pushing a relatively hard gear at a fast cadence.

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Strategies for Strength: The Wisdom of Yoda

What if there weren’t any other options? This famous character has a very important lesson we can tell our students: listen to the man! This article also gives you some tips on knowing whether or not you might be pushing your students beyond their limits (hint: you probably aren’t)!

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Strategies for Strength: What’s Your Mantra?

Have you used mantras to inspire your students up epic climbs? Do you know how they work? Here are the reasons behind why mantras help focus athletes on the task at hand, as well as 85 different mantras you can use in your coaching, and tips on how to personalize them and to inspire your students to create their own.

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