Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 1

Coaching resistance is one of the more challenging aspects of being an indoor cycling instructor. In this series, you will learn the two most common yet ineffective methods of teaching resistance. We will then provide you with a technique of encouraging your riders to add load in a way that will help them experience what your profile is calling for so they can be more successful. We will end with dozens of creative coaching cues for adding resistance. You will emerge a better, more informed instructor.

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Muscular Strength Profile: Stampede!

If you love proving that indoor cycling is not just for cardio bunnies, this is the profile for you. The overall goal is to place as much force on the leg muscles as possible for the duration of each muscular strength interval. Consider this profile the equivalent of performing single-leg squats or lunges—800 of them!

The intervals are short, but they are intense. If done correctly, each interval will bring a rider close to failure in the last seconds.

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How to Educate Your Riders, Part 4: Using Storytelling and Non-Cycling Examples

Continuing our series on Educating Your Students, Christine gives some suggestions about how to use non-cycling examples to help students understand cycling technique and what they should be feeling while pedaling. She does this primarily through storytelling in her profiles, although that’s not a prerequisite of the method. Christine is an expert at this technique and has been extremely successful educating her students.

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Powerful Words Create Performances in the Olympics…and in Your Cycling Class

What does the coxswain of the 2012 Olympic rowing team and indoor cycling instructors have in common? Powerful words!

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Educating Your Students, Part 2: Using Humor, Metaphors, and Analogies

Everyone had a class with a fun and wacky science teacher in high school, right? I’m not advocating that we start developing quirks or acting wacky in our indoor cycling classes, but the point is, making education fun using humor and wit is a great way to learn AND and a fun way to teach. Hopefully our dating, bagels, poultry, and pasta analogies will spark some ideas to create some of your own wacky ways to explain something on the bike.

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Should Indoor Cycling Instructors Educate Our Riders? Part 1

At first I was confused by this question. As indoor cycling instructors, why would we not educate our riders? As a rider, why would I not want to know more about how a class, drill, or movement was going to impact me? It seems silly. There are times when we need to educate a rider to help them make corrections in their form. Education can also provide great motivation to try or persist, knowing the ultimate short- and long-term benefits.

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Magic Coaching Minute: Bouncing in the Saddle

How can you help riders quiet their form and eliminate bouncing? Jennifer Sage and Tom Scotto discuss why this happens and provide a few solutions.

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Top 7 Ways to Grow as an Indoor Cycling Instructor in 2018

This year, I want to challenge you to reach new heights in your coaching. This may mean moving out of your own comfort zone. It’s something we ask of our riders all the time; how about ourselves? What can we do to push ourselves, to take risks, to put ourselves out there in front of our students and announce to the world that we aren’t afraid of growth?

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6 Ways Recording Your Class Can Take You from Critical to Confident

As indoor cycling coaches, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our delivery and clarity in class so that we may continue to grow. This article explores one uncomfortable way for us to tackle our growth by audio recording our classes, then listening to ourselves and adjusting based on what we hear.

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Anatomy of Inquiry-Based Coaching

When it comes to cueing in the cycling studio, there are two distinct paths instructors can take: telling and asking. Both have their place and both are paired nicely with showing, or demonstrating. Cori explains how incorporating questions into your cueing can elicit more effort toward the goal and ownership in the outcome from your riders.

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