Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

Anatomy of Inquiry-Based Coaching

When it comes to cueing in the cycling studio, there are two distinct paths instructors can take: telling and asking. Both have their place and both are paired nicely with showing, or demonstrating. Cori explains how incorporating questions into your cueing can elicit more effort toward the goal and ownership in the outcome from your riders.

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Ask the Expert: How Do You Do a Spin-Up and Is It Different From a Surge or a Sprint?

I received a great question recently in the ICA Facebook group from Sarah asking what the difference between a “spin-up” and a “surge” is. We had an Ask the Expert post from 2013 with a similar question from Angela asking, “How exactly do you teach a spin-up? Is it different from a sprint?”  So, I have edited the previous article below and updated it with Sarah’s question to help you fully understand what a spin-up is and how to teach one, including referencing a full profile on these drills.

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The Value of Silence

Sometimes what we don’t do is more important than what we do. Sometimes letting go is better than holding on. Sometimes less is more. Learn when not to speak in class so that your words will be all the more powerful when you chose to use them.

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Developing Your Style as an Indoor Cycling Instructor, Part 2

Part 2 of this series outlines the six steps to help you as you pursue your journey to develop your style as an instructor. When you become an authentic and inspirational coach, your students will remember your words any time they encounter challenges in their lives, physical or mental. I guarantee that when you do, you will hear comments such as, “because of you, I didn’t give up!”

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Developing Your Style as an Indoor Cycling Coach, Part 1

Whether you are a recently certified new instructor or you have a few years under your belt, developing your style as a cycling coach is an important component of being your best. This two-part series will help you discover and develop your most authentic coaching style and to become the inspirational mentor you aspire to be.

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Mantras for Tempo and Endurance Rides

One of our more popular series on ICA is a set of articles with various strategies for inspiring your students up long climbs. The series was called Strategy for Strength, and is one of the favorites we’ve done on ICA. One of the strategies was to inspire students to come up with a mantra that they repeat over and over to themselves as they climb. Of course, mantras aren’t just for climbing. I was inspired recently to come up with some for sustained tempo pace.

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Why Cueing “Base Plus” is Completely Off Base

The term “base plus” along with an absolute number of watts, turns, or gears is often confusing and may be unsafe for riders. Bill explains why you should avoid using it and offers suggestions for its replacement.

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Putting High-Intensity Interval Training in Perspective

This article from our archives points out some of the misuse of high-intensity training in the indoor cycling world (and the fitness world in general) and gives some advice to keep the plethora of information being blasted to the masses in perspective. Remember: Real Training. Real Cycling. Real Results. All beautifully packaged in a fun wrapper.

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Cueing: To Associate or Dissociate?

Dr. Perlus explains when associative versus dissociative cueing is more appropriate to help guide your students to either focus on what they are doing and feeling, or to take their minds away from it. There is a time and a place for both methods, based on many years of research.

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Ask the Expert: How Much Coaching in Class is Too Much?

Aisha asked me, how much cueing is too much? No one likes an instructor who talks non-stop, but we’ve also been in classes where not enough good cueing is given and the class seems to be at a loss on what to do or how hard to go. Here are 9 things to consider when doing a self-analysis on whether you are talking too much (or enough) in your classes.

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