Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

Mantras for Tempo and Endurance Rides

One of our more popular series on ICA is a set of articles with various strategies for inspiring your students up long climbs. The series was called Strategy for Strength, and is one of the favorites we’ve done on ICA. One of the strategies was to inspire students to come up with a mantra that they repeat over and over to themselves as they climb. Of course, mantras aren’t just for climbing. I was inspired recently to come up with some for sustained tempo pace.

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Why Cueing “Base Plus” is Completely Off Base

The term “base plus” along with an absolute number of watts, turns, or gears is often confusing and may be unsafe for riders. Bill explains why you should avoid using it and offers suggestions for its replacement.

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Putting High-Intensity Interval Training in Perspective

This article from our archives points out some of the misuse of high-intensity training in the indoor cycling world (and the fitness world in general) and gives some advice to keep the plethora of information being blasted to the masses in perspective. Remember: Real Training. Real Cycling. Real Results. All beautifully packaged in a fun wrapper.

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Cueing: To Associate or Dissociate?

Dr. Perlus explains when associative versus dissociative cueing is more appropriate to help guide your students to either focus on what they are doing and feeling, or to take their minds away from it. There is a time and a place for both methods, based on many years of research.

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Ask the Expert: How Much Coaching in Class is Too Much?

Aisha asked me, how much cueing is too much? No one likes an instructor who talks non-stop, but we’ve also been in classes where not enough good cueing is given and the class seems to be at a loss on what to do or how hard to go. Here are 9 things to consider when doing a self-analysis on whether you are talking too much (or enough) in your classes.

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Help New Students Feel Welcome to Your Class, Part 4: A New Student Handout Can Be a Lifeline

New students need so much in so little time. It’s a big challenge for you to give new students everything they need in a way that is neither threatening nor overwhelming. Here’s some help. A simple take-home handout for new students can be a lifeline—for you both!

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Just Got Certified: Now What? Tips for New Instructors, Part 1

Some new instructors are more challenged than others with stage fright, especially if they do not come from a group fitness background. Most of these insecurities are easily quelled with practice, practice, practice. Allow yourself the time and space to make mistakes. Here are some tips for new instructors that will minimize your nervousness as you move beyond your certification.

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How Many Turns on the Resistance Knob?

Have you ever cued to turn up the resistance by giving a number of turns to your class? You may want to find a better way to cue resistance! Caesar filmed a brief video for his riders who have been used to being told the number of turns expected, so he wanted to show them why it’s not an effective cue. We hope this helps you so you can explain to your class why you don’t cue that way.

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How to Get Riders to Follow Your Instructions with the 3-2-1 Approach

One of the many benefits to teaching indoor cycling is that it designed to be a multi-level class requiring little coordination and choreography. While we’re not looking for military precision in unified movement and intensity, there are often unspoken expectations that the instructor has for the riders. When a rider, or the entire group of riders, strays too far, it can become distracting. In this article, Cori Parks suggests a simple approach to classroom management.

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Top 7 Ways to Grow as an Indoor Cycling Instructor in 2017

This year, I want to challenge you to reach new heights in your coaching. This may mean moving out of your own comfort zone. It’s something we ask of our riders all the time; how about ourselves? What can we do to push ourselves, to take risks, to put ourselves out there in front of our students and announce to the world that we aren’t afraid of growth?

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