Currently Browsing: Coaching and Cueing

How to Incorporate Long Intervals, Part 1: Why Longer Intervals Are Important

Incorporating longer intervals of 5 to 20 minutes can be the key to a higher level of fitness, regardless of what your specific goals are. For some reason, however, there is a reticence to the idea of longer intervals. Here are six reasons why you should teach your riders to love longer intervals in high Zone 3 to Zone 4.

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Three Advanced Cueing Methods to Help Participants Dial Up Success

Cycling instructors face an interesting challenge. We have the task of putting together safe, effective, and fun workouts, while choosing music that will motivate and move the soul. Beyond that we must also clearly, concisely, and repeatedly convey meaning, feeling, and intention to a room full of very different people with diverse learning styles and potentially dissimilar fitness levels. This article addresses your road map to success by describing three specific methods of communication to convey the desired level of effort and intensity required by participants within each and every class you teach.

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How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 5

In part 4 of this series I gave you critical information about how to cue resistance so that students find the amount of load or gear they need to meet the goals you set for that segment of your profile. In part 5, we manipulate the variables of that vital equation. I also give you 7 drills that you can use to create your own awareness exercises, solidifying the concept in your riders’ minds.

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How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 4

In part 4 of this series, I get to the meat of cueing resistance in a way that encourages students to find the gear they need to meet the goals you set for that segment of your profile. You coach this by teaching them the most vital equation they’ll learn in your classes.

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How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 3

In parts 1 and 2, I discussed two approaches to avoid when cueing resistance. In this and the following article, I provide tips on how to teach the concept of resistance and inspire your riders to add enough so that they achieve the adaptations your profile is targeting. This article describes the warm-up and provides cues for establishing that first touch of the resistance knob or gear level so riders can prepare the body at the proper intensity.

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How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 2

In part 1, I described a popular but ineffective coaching method that fails to account for the difference in abilities and fitness of riders or the differences in the wear and tear on bikes. The second method of teaching resistance that instructors should steer clear of is to assign a 1–10 scale of resistance. This one is even worse than assigning a number of turns. It’s very confusing, it’s subjective, and it’s not anchored to anything.

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How to Coach Resistance in Your Indoor Cycling Class, Part 1

Coaching resistance is one of the more challenging aspects of being an indoor cycling instructor. In this series, you will learn the two most common yet ineffective methods of teaching resistance. We will then provide you with a technique of encouraging your riders to add load in a way that will help them experience what your profile is calling for so they can be more successful. We will end with dozens of creative coaching cues for adding resistance. You will emerge a better, more informed instructor.

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Muscular Strength Profile: Stampede!

If you love proving that indoor cycling is not just for cardio bunnies, this is the profile for you. The overall goal is to place as much force on the leg muscles as possible for the duration of each muscular strength interval. Consider this profile the equivalent of performing single-leg squats or lunges—800 of them!

The intervals are short, but they are intense. If done correctly, each interval will bring a rider close to failure in the last seconds.

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How to Educate Your Riders, Part 4: Using Storytelling and Non-Cycling Examples

Continuing our series on Educating Your Students, Christine gives some suggestions about how to use non-cycling examples to help students understand cycling technique and what they should be feeling while pedaling. She does this primarily through storytelling in her profiles, although that’s not a prerequisite of the method. Christine is an expert at this technique and has been extremely successful educating her students.

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Powerful Words Create Performances in the Olympics…and in Your Cycling Class

What does the coxswain of the 2012 Olympic rowing team and indoor cycling instructors have in common? Powerful words!

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