Currently Browsing: Biomechanics, Cadence, Power

An Incredible Way to Learn About the Effects of Your Profiles and Coaching

When you learn how to read and interpret a workout file it is an amazing tool to aid in putting together profiles. You will better understand the possible impact your choices (cadence, resistance, power, etc.) will have on your riders. By looking at a file from a less fit rider who suffered in the class or was unable to do the prescribed workout, you will understand why some might struggle with your coaching. Or, maybe you might discover that some things you are doing might not be as effective as you thought.

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Strategies for Strength: Climbing at Tempo

Many of us have seen professional riders climbing the famed ascents of the Tour de France. One observation is the speed at which they climb. Not just how fast their bikes are going, but how fast their legs are spinning. This faster climbing cadence is often referred to as “climbing at tempo.” For those of us that ride outside, this is not climbing in one’s granny gear (no offense, Mom), but pushing a relatively hard gear at a fast cadence.

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Strategies for Strength: Activate Those Hip Flexors

This strategy for strength dips in the world of biomechanics—one of my favorite topics! We can sometimes spend hours working on our pedal stroke seated, but neglect full muscle usage when standing. When proper pedal stroke technique is not emphasized out of the saddle, riders usually resort to simply mashing down on the pedals. This only activates the quadriceps and reduces efficiency, endurance, and power. So let’s throw some hip in there.

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OCD: The Olympic Rings Pedal Stroke Drill

I’ve been teaching this pedal stroke drill for almost as long as I’ve been teaching (20 years). I first introduced it at a conference in my session called The Anatomy of the Pedal Stroke at WSSC in 2002. It’s a fabulous visual to help riders connect with their pedal strokes.

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Respect the Bike: Create Safe and Scientifically Sound Cycling Classes

The ignorance of exercise science in the cycling studio has to stop!

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Establishing Training Zones Using a Maximal Aerobic Power (MAP) Ramp Test

We’ve provided you with a detailed class profile for you to conduct your own MAP (maximal aerobic power) ramp test, including the protocol, the coaching, the music, and a downloadable spreadsheet which will estimate FTP and your riders’ power training zones.

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OCD: Get Yourself Connected

This drill is perfect for those who are just learning how to teach with power. It shows your riders very clearly how heart rate response can be very different at different cadences, even when output is the same. This drill may become a “light bulb moment” for your riders and their understanding of how power—and their body—works! For that reason, it may be the most important educational drill in your repertoire.

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Functional Threshold Power: What it Is and Why it Matters

If you are fortunate enough teach in facility with bikes that have power meters, you might be wondering about how to use this tool most effectively in your classes. The first step is to establish a benchmark value to help define intensity and structure class profiles.

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5 Ways Power Training Will be a Game Changer in Your Indoor Cycling Classes

Unfortunately, many instructors and participants are intimidated by power at first because they think it’s too technical, too complicated, or only useful for “serious” cyclists. But once you understand the basics, it’s actually a very straightforward tool, and a great way to challenge and engage participants, regardless of whether they ride outside or not. Here are five ways teaching with power will be a game changer in your teaching.

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Calories: What You Need to Know Now

With the New Year upon us, you will be getting a LOT of questions about calories burned in your cycling class. How much do you know about the calorie estimates you see on your heart rate monitor, computer console, or power meter? Are these estimates accurate? Here is everything you need to understand how the wrong information—or faulty understanding of the data—can lead you or your riders to believe they did more work than they actually did.

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