Ask the Expert (Follow-Up): Healing the Pedal Stroke—Ankling

It is always great to see the response of our cycling instructor and coach community. A number of questions arose after I published the last Ask the Expert article on “Healing the Pedal Stroke.” The focus was solely on the practice of pushing down or dropping the heel below horizontal during the pedal stroke. In addition to my response to questions and feedback, I created a video using footage from the 2013 USA Cycling Pro Challenge to demonstrate the technique. Hey, pictures are worth a thousand words, right?

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Ask The Expert: Healing the Pedal Stroke

The Question: Should you push the heels down when pedaling?

The Short Answer: NO

Let’s talk about why…

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Muscular Strength Profile: Stampede!

If you love proving that indoor cycling is not just for cardio bunnies, this is the profile for you. The overall goal is to place as much force on the leg muscles as possible for the duration of each muscular strength interval. Consider this profile the equivalent of performing single-leg squats or lunges—800 of them!

The intervals are short, but they are intense. If done correctly, each interval will bring a rider close to failure in the last seconds.

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Should Indoor Cycling Instructors Educate Our Riders? Part 1

At first I was confused by this question. As indoor cycling instructors, why would we not educate our riders? As a rider, why would I not want to know more about how a class, drill, or movement was going to impact me? It seems silly. There are times when we need to educate a rider to help them make corrections in their form. Education can also provide great motivation to try or persist, knowing the ultimate short- and long-term benefits.

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You Just Wait: Indoor Cycling Injuries Lurk

When it comes to overuse injures, I’d rather not wait. Cycling is an activity used by many physical therapists for rehabilitation. When done properly, cycling is very gentle on the joints and muscles. I repeat…when done properly.

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The New Instructor: 10 Tips for Mastering the Class Intro, Part 3

And now the last four tips to complete a well-rounded class introduction: Safety, Form & Technique, Hand Positions, and Cadence.

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The New Instructor: 10 Tips for Mastering the Class Intro, Part 2

Our next three tips to help you master the class intro: The Class Objective, Training Zones (RPE), and encouraging your riders to Work at Their Own Pace.

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Putting High-Intensity Interval Training in Perspective

This article from our archives points out some of the misuse of high-intensity training in the indoor cycling world (and the fitness world in general) and gives some advice to keep the plethora of information being blasted to the masses in perspective. Remember: Real Training. Real Cycling. Real Results. All beautifully packaged in a fun wrapper.

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The New Instructor: 10 Tips for Mastering the Class Intro, Part 1

New instructors are faced with a dilemma: you cue the music to begin teaching your first indoor cycling class and realize there is so much information to cover within the first few minutes of class. Will you remember it all? Will you explain everything correctly? Will someone remove the butterflies from your stomach? Welcome to part 1 of a 3-part series to master your class intro.

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Strategies for Strength: Climbing at Tempo

Many of us have seen professional riders climbing the famed ascents of the Tour de France. One observation is the speed at which they climb. Not just how fast their bikes are going, but how fast their legs are spinning. This faster climbing cadence is often referred to as “climbing at tempo.” For those of us that ride outside, this is not climbing in one’s granny gear (no offense, Mom), but pushing a relatively hard gear at a fast cadence.

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