Technology is Here to Stay for Indoor Cycling Instructors and Studios

Technology can help you teach your classes, it can help your riders improve their performance, and best of all (at least from a business standpoint), it can raise you above your competition and fill your classes. You might as well learn the technology that is available to our industry and how to capitalize on it. Gene Nacey of Cycling Fusion will be providing us with monthly tech tips. Read more to find out about a few of the upcoming topics in this exciting area of studio cycling!

Read More...

The Difference between Exercise and Training Just Might Change Your Life

The difference between Exercise and Training is knowledge, structure, and intention. Could making the transition from one to the other be the start of a new and better you?

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 19 Part 2: Building Power Workouts

In this final chapter of the Power Training e-book, Gene leaves us with this message, “This is why this book was written. This is why this is my full time occupation–creating resources for indoor cycling–because to train properly with the objective of wasting no time, insuring results, and having fun along the way takes time and dedication to get right. Not only are we spending time to get it right, but we are also making sure we can repeat the process, and thus reap the benefits multiple times over. That seems worth it to me. What about you?

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 19 Part 1: Building Power Workouts

What turns a workout into a power workout is simply the overall objective of that ride. While we can call these ‘power’ workouts, they will also improve your cardiovascular performance. The physical systems that produce energy in your body are all connected, and it is hard to affect one without impacting the other. We can target our workouts for specific applications of power, and this chapter will provide examples of this.

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 18 Part 2: Improving Your Power

As a way of establishing a sort of profile or fingerprint of your metabolic efficiency and rate of decoupling, you can establish what power you are able to generate at the top of each zone. The reason we look to the top of each zone is that in at least two of the five zones, this represents the point right before you ‘cross over’ into an area of more costly power generation. In other words, you are likely to get the most ‘bang for your buck’ if you can keep the effort just short of the threshold crossovers.

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 18 Part 1: Improving Your Power

This chapter discusses how you can raise your limiters (what is holding you back…VO2? LT?), how your body responds to power generation (metabolic load) and proposes which zones you should work in. It’s all starting to come together in this amazing e-book on power!

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 17 (Part 1): Teaching With Power

This is the money chapter in this e-book on teaching with power! Even though bikes with power are increasing, instructors aren’t receiving the education they need to teach with power properly. Gene gives six “Dos” and six “Don’ts” when teaching with power, and lists numerous tips and tricks to increase your effectiveness when teaching with this amazing tool. (Part 2 of this chapter will post tomorrow)

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 16: Testing & Validation

Knowing the importance of having purpose for our training, and that no one wants to spend time doing something and have nothing to show for it, we must test ourselves and then validate our training programs and techniques. This chapter will discuss the assessments you need to incorporate in your power training program, and how to interpret the results.

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 15: Rider Profiles

Even if we don’t understand slow twitch from fast twitch to nose twitch, the muscle fiber mixes we are born will inevitably guide us towards riding or racing that takes advantage of our strengths, and minimizes the drawbacks of our weaknesses. We are encouraged by what we do best and thus we continue to build on it. Add a little training that continues to improve on our strengths, and some desire to achieve objectives with those strengths, and now we will begin to see specific rider types emerge in a way that can actually be quantified to help with both prescribing training as well as understanding just how variable power is from one individual to another.

Read More...

Power Training for Indoor Cycling Chapter 14: Translation & Interpretation (part 2)

I am a big proponent of using all of the tools at your disposal, so the idea of training without a heart monitor just leaves too much information on the table. Why handicap yourself for something that is both easy and relatively inexpensive to measure? More to the point, heart rate should be seen as what it ‘costs you’ to generate a specific power level and sustain that level.

Read More...

« Previous Entries